Microsoft and Google Heighten Competition in the Classroom

Microsoft and Google appear to be preparing to do battle in theeducational marketplace.  I believe Microsoft has  always seen schools and teachers as their primary clientele, and Google has more recently developed more tools that are attracting new users to their services.  Microsoft spent the last year in efforts to refocus and renew their classroom efforts.  Microsoft spent the last year talking to thousands of teachers and designing high-tech experiments that require mostly low-cost parts.  It will give the designs to schools for free so teachers can use them in their lesson plans.

Google has gained ground in public schools by offering a tightly connected system of free classroom apps, lower cost laptops called Chromebooks and a web-based console that allows schools to remotely manage thousands of student devices.  Industry analysts said Microsoft’s initiative was the company’s first credible response to Google’s recent encroachment into education.  Microsoft executives are looking forward to seizing  the chance to make an updated impression on future consumers.

So the classroom has become a new battleground for these giant tech companies to clash for future customers.  Let’s just hope that America’s students and teachers come out the winners.

Ray Myers

P.S.  I will not be posting a blog on Monday, May 8, but will return on Wednesday, May 10.  Enjoy your weekend.


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American Lobbying in Europe – We Can Help You!

“We’re here to help.”  And if you are lobbying for an American tech firm in Europe, you may find that a lot of those countries’ political and business leaders are not very convinced of our benign intentions.  Google appears to be the most successful to date in helping our European friends fill a funding gap that exists there, particularly in terms of technology improvements for schools and museums.  Perhaps the biggest challenge for Google is to convince European leaders that they will fully protect citizens’ privacy rights online.

Another major concern appears to be that Google will have too much control over how Europeans gain access to digital services.  I don’t think that this has become a major concern in the U.S. ?  I believe we have come to use Google as our all-purpose search engine, “Google it!”  Is it a question of losing our individual autonomy by using the most powerful and reliable search tool at our disposal?  We still have the prerogative of using other search engines, but let’s be honest, size and scope of these searches do matter.   Yahoo!

But it seems apparent that Europeans’ perceptions of American interests in Europe and elsewhere might always be tinged by the impressions we left behind after the Second World War: “oversexed, overpaid, and over here.”

Ray Myers


Let’s Make America Great Again – Really Connect All Schools to the Internet

It’s almost been twenty years since American schools began having access to funding to wire their schools though the federally funded e-Rate program administered by the Federal Communication Commission (FCC).   Unfortunately, if you live in a poor rural area of this country, you will still find that the speed and reliability of connections to your schools are not what they are in your state’s larger cities or more populous communities.  It will not be high-speed Internet.  In fact, teachers and students may be spending more time trying to connect to the Internet than in actually teaching and learning with it.  I know Al Gore has moved on to saving the world’s environment but we could really use his help on this one since he very instrumental when all this began during the Clinton years.  He must be feeling our pain.

There are a relatively small number of schools and communities that have this lack of needed connectivity, but our larges telecommunications companies seem to have little interest in connecting to them.  And there is little competition to provide services.  Seven percent of U.S. schools nationwide fail to find bidders when looking to upgrade Internet connectivity according to the Consortium for School Networking (CoSN).  Should our federal, state and local governments be doing more?  Or should we just let a “free market” take care of all this.  Students in many European and Asian countries have better connectivity.  (See U.S. Department of Education report on International Experiences with Technology in Education, http://tech.ed.gov/files/2013/10/iete-full-report-1.doc).

I know there are many geopolitical and geographic challenges that are unique to our American schools.  But we are, or can be, “great” again as we will continue to hear throughout this campaign year.  Let’s make our schools part of that challenge, promise?

Ray Myers

Tech-free Time?

I wonder what we would all do if we set aside certain times, days, occasions, etc., when we would all be “tech-free.”  This may be the hardest of all for our children, but for many adults, this would also be a wrenching experience.

I think you will find that some of our educational institutions at all levels are beginning to recognize the value of being “tech-free,” allowing administrators, teachers and professors to impose such restrictions at selected times.  At some schools in the boroughs of New York City, for example, there is a booming cottage industry in the storage of students’ cell phones outside the schools’ doors in renovated ice cream vans. There still may be plenty of technology inside the school, but imposing a ban on cell phones does appear to provide some degree of internal control.

The school building itself may be the last bastion for encouraging socialization (along with learning) across generations.

Ray Myers