Looking for a New House – Don’t Build It, Print It

The title of this post may be a bit of an exaggeration, but technological advances now make it possible to build your own house if you have a mobile construction 3D printer that is capable of printing whole buildings completely on-site.  Based on recent experiences in the actually construction of such homes, the estimated total cost could be $10,134, or $25 per square foot, when using the highest quality materials.  The cost includes the foundation, roof, interior and exterior walls, wall insulation, windows, floors and suspended ceiling.   The company Apis Cor continues to develop the techniques and improve upon the cost per square foot; its product could have enormous benefits for providing affordable housing and allowing for faster recovery after natural disasters.

The term “3D printing” gives way to “additive manufacturing” for industrial use.  It differs from standard manufacturing processes of starting with your raw materials and then removing from them in the form of cutting, drilling, machining, and so on – all of which leave you with material waste.  Additive manufacturing means that you start with nothing and  only add what you need.  This is true in the construction industry as well.  It seems like both a financially responsible and environmentally friendly goal to have a process that would help to eliminate additional resources and the potential for a pile of construction waste at the end of the project.  The technology also allows for different methods of printing walls to achieve the desired thermal insulation.

These hi-tech homes could be very convenient “spaces” to house unexpected overnight guests and relatives.  I would not recommend, however, that in-laws be included in this category.)

Ray Myers



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Indy Tech – Midwestern Manufacturing Hub Goes Digital

So it seems that the city of Indianapolis has some ideas of its own in terms of making that part of America “great again.”  Some young professionals see “digital” opportunity there in contrast to Trump’s plan to bring back those manufacturing “hub” cities (and jobs) of the last century.   And guess who used to be Governor there, Vice-President Mike Pence.  Not only is he in favor of bringing back the good old days, he also wants to bring back that “old time religion.”

Then Governor Pence ruffled the feathers of the tech industry back in 2015 when he signed the Religious Freedom Restoration Act which allowed businesses to cite religion as a reason to refuse to serve customers – a move that people say was aimed at the gay community.  To his critics that alleged such discriminatory intent, he has responded that he was simply trying to ensure religious freedom?  Unfortunately, this legislation has had a chilling effect in terms of the growth of Indiana’s economy across many business sectors.   Some technology entrepreneurs and engineers, however, still see opportunity there.  Many  see a chance to play a larger role there than they might have had in Silicon Valley.

A larger role, perhaps, but with less of a salary that she could have earned in Silicon Valley.  Many young professionals simply like living in a “prime Midwestern technology center.”

Ray Myers