Please Don’t Email Me – Let’s Talk

Maybe it was just a matter of time, but it looks like email may be falling under its own weight.  Take a look at your inbox.  Do you pride yourself in having all those important messages just waiting for your witty and pithy responses, or are you just impressed with the scope and depth of your importance in the age of the Internet?  Or maybe you are just fooling yourself and others?  Something will be getting done in the long run, but I think you may be losing something else in the process.  You may actually be able to get more done, more efficiently by returning to the days of meeting face-to-face, or talking on a phone of any kind.  Not to mention honing your interpersonal skills in the process, if that is important to you?

“Email sometimes tricks us into feeling efficient, but it rarely is.  Because it’s asynchronous, and because there are no limits to space and time, it often leads to endless, pointless ruminations.”  If decision-makers had ditched email and just held a 15 minute meeting, members of the campaign (presidential) could have hashed out some decisions more quickly in private.  “In other words, limits often help.  Get on the phone, make a decision, ditch your inbox.  The world will be better off for it.”

In the words of one security expert, in light of the hacked world we live in: “If you have something sensitive to say, you’re going to use the phone or walk down the hallway.”

Ray Myers


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Digitally Yours

Too busy this holiday season or any other time of the year to write handwritten notes, no problem!  You now have Bond, not James, who can take care of all that for you.  In this case, technology will reproduce your own handwriting, or any other if you prefer, and dispatch all of these carefully crafted personalized missives for you.  Now, of course, there is a price for this convenience, but who has the time any more to send all these “thank-yous,” and all I can tell you is that Bond’s business is booming, at least in the New York area.

Good manners and good business sense all wrapped into one thanks to robotics.  These robots, however, can be programmed to write in your own handwritten script or any other you may prefer.  There are currently 200 robotic writing machines in Bond’s  Manhattan facilities.  An invitation only service costs $1,200 a year and provides clients with a personalized mobile app to send notes in their own handwriting on custom stationary.  Other personalized messaging services range from $3.50 to $2.50 per card (corporate accounts with large orders).

Most customers like the fact that it is more than a text message, and is perceived as a more thoughtful sentiment.  No one will ever have to know it came from a robot!  And it comes in an envelope with a wax seal, a very thoughtful, personal touch, from anybody or a machine.

Ray Myers