Special Needs Not Met – More Than Online Needed

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/04/23/education/learning/coronavirus-teachers-special-needs-students.html

Ray Myers

P.S. Council for Exceptional Children letter to members

March 20, 2020

Dear CEC Members,

Special education teachers are asked to adapt every day—there’s no doubt that what you are being asked to adapt to right now stretches that ask to unimaginable limits. For all that you are continuing to do for our students, I thank you. This week has seen CEC embarking on new journeys to support you: new webinars, opening up resources, and offering free membership to all in our community who need help.

Yesterday, a stimulus bill was introduced into the Senate that contained provisions for education. One of those provisions directs the Secretary of Education to come back in 30 days with a list of waivers needed for Congress to provide under IDEA and the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 to assist the special education community during this pandemic.

Today, CEC President Jennifer Lesh provided a response to the stimulus bill that stresses the need for relief of administrative burden and flexibility so that you can continue to do what’s best for your students, and you need that relief now. In addition, we stressed our commitment to IDEA and the importance of ensuring that whatever changes are made to assist you in this time are strictly limited to dealing with the COVID disruption. We do not want any action by Congress to undo the right children with exceptionalities have to a free, appropriate public education. In addition, we stressed the need for additional funding to support education services during this time.

In the coming days, we will monitor this bill’s progress in both the House and the Senate. In addition, we will engage with the Department of Education to provide input so that any waivers that are enacted to provide you relief are in the best interest of our community and happen as quickly as possible. We will seek your input and, when need, call for action to support our efforts.

In the meantime, please continue to do the next best things for your students. And take care of yourself. I know we will get through this together.

Best,

Chad Rummel
CEC Executive Director

Connecting Online in the Age of the Coronavirus

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/03/19/style/coronavirus-quarantine-socializing.html

Ray Myers

P.S.

MORE CORONAVIRUS NEWS – Peace Corps Evacuations

Peace Corps Volunteers (7,334 in 61 countries) were recently evacuated from countries around the world. If you would like to be of assistance to these Volunteers “relocation” efforts, please visit the site below:

https://www.facebook.com/groups/PeaceCorpsCOVIDevacuationsupport/?ref=share

Another online support group for PCV evacuees:

https://support.peacecorpsconnect.org/info

Google – Trump’s Best Friend?

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/03/21/opinion/google-covid-trump.html

Ray Myers

MORE CORONAVIRUS NEWS – Peace Corps Evacuations

Peace Corps Volunteers (7,334 in 61 countries) were recently evacuated from countries around the world (China included), If you would like to be of assistance in these Volunteers “relocation” efforts, please visit the site below:

https://www.facebook.com/groups/PeaceCorpsCOVIDevacuationsupport/?ref=share

Don’t Worry, Mr. President, China has a Bigger Digital Divide!

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/03/17/technology/china-schools-coronavirus.html

P.S. MORE CORONAVIRUS NEWS

Peace Corps Volunteers (7,334 in 61 countries) were recently evacuated from countries around the world (China included), If you would like to be of assistance in these Volunteers “relocation” efforts, please visit the site below:

https://www.facebook.com/groups/PeaceCorpsCOVIDevacuationsupport/?ref=share

Students Still Like to Learn From Teachers, Many Dislike When Computers Become Proxies for Them

Students Like Tech, but Also Teachers

Children like technology. They like playing games, watching videos, finding music and interacting with their peers on social media. They like exploring the endless resources of the internet.

Educators notice this and assume that computers and other devices will capture students’ interest in school.

Ninety-three percent of principals and 86 percent of teachers say that increased student engagement is the most important benefit of using computers and tablets in classrooms, according to the latest data from the Speak Up Research Initiative, which surveyed more than 26,000 teachers and librarians and almost 2,200 administrators last year.

Nearly 70 percent of district administrators said they considered engagement to be the most effective sign that a piece of educational technology is useful.

Speak Up got a very different response from the roughly 290,000 students it surveyed: Just 41 percent of middle school students and 35 percent of high school students said they strongly associated classroom technology with increased engagement.

What is more, anecdotal interviews, along with data from YouthTruth, a national nonprofit that conducts student surveys, indicate that many students actually dislike when teachers turn over instruction to computers. They say they prefer learning directly from teachers — because they think teachers are the experts or that it’s their job — and many complain about spending too much time on screens, between their schoolwork and their use of technology at home.

Gen Z may walk through life glued to smartphones, but that does not mean they want to use computers in class. TARA GARCÍA MATHEWSON

Ray Myers